RSPCA Ashley Heath | Updates Waste Water System with a Bio Bubble

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RSPCA Ashley Heath was previously served by two septic tank arrangements. Apart from the relative close proximity to Moors River, the site was blighted each year (for the winter months) due to high water tables backing water up the line from the drain fields and back into the septic tanks; at which point the Centre became more reliant on tanker attendance to ease the situation and keep the centre open. Our Bio Bubble sequenced batch reactor process enabled us to pump the final effluent away from the treatment plant in order that the natural water table levels did not interfere with the drainage network, keeping space for the foul water to be collected.

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The animal rescue centre can accommodate up to 54 dogs in kennels, with a cattery that can house 84 animals and needs 12 – 15 staff to manage the site.
Most typical package treatment plants struggle with the proper treatment of dog waste but not the Bio Bubble; our experience extends to having operated for the RSPCA 14 sites across the country from the typical animal rescue centre to the larger animal hospital at RSPCA Newbrook, which provides animal welfare services to the Birmingham area.
Prior to the installation contract commencing it was necessary to get the legal formalities in place with The Environment Agency, we were tasked to act as the RSPCA’s Agent. It was necessary to apply for a variation for one of the Septic Tanks consented discharges, then, once we had completed the installation and commissioning, with diversion of all the necessary infrastructure to the single point of collection at the head of our Balance Tank, we were then required to surrender the other consented discharge. Because of the location the new bespoke permit legal numerical compliance levels were significantly tightened; septic tank waste quality tightened to BOD 10 mg/l, Suspended Solids 20 mg/l, Ammoniacal nitrates 2 mg/l. The plant recently passed an Environment Agency Audit with the EA’s Environment Officers recording zero ammonia.
 

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